How flexible ARE your shoulders, really?
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Boy oh boy!

Some dreams are just so viserally emotive.

They all are, but some really – you wake up – or I do, at least, I can literally “feel” the emotions physically.

For the nutjobs out there, I ain’t talking wet dreams either. Hehe.

(though thats a real thing sometimes)

But anyway, that isn’t – or “aint”, as even my little girl has started to say, truly a chip off the old block – what I’m talking about or going to write to you about today.

It’s shoulder flexibility.

Picture the following, you put your arms behind your back, perhaps holding a sheet of paper, or twig or something, fingers pointed backwards (and downwards).

You hold. Thats all. No stretching, squeezing, fancy isometrics or nothing …

… And you lift up, and over your head, while maintaining the same position.

And go over your head, and back down in front of you.

Thats it.

Easy peasy, lemon squeezy eh.

Except, it ain’t

Just 30% of that movement is where most people, even “strong” people stop – including yours truly whose always been inflexible to a degree – big time, actually, in the shoulders, hamstrings and groin.

Partially due to genetics, partially due to the “sit and study” thing enforced upon me (which I never did, I’d hide a book or something under what I was supposed to studying. Chemistry. Ugh. Hehe).

But that movement, and then another one I see in China all the time, full grown adults doing a 360 on the chinning bar – not necessarily “strong” adults, or those that can pump out a shitton of pull-ups … has always been kinda beyond me.

I’m getting far better in terms of shoulder flexibility NOW, of course, but Im talking “most of my life” here.

Ditto for hamstrings!

I’ve written to you about how I’d do pushups well in martial arts class back in the day.

I’d be the only one instinctively touching my chest to the ground, slow and steady on each rep (the form mangling I see on this great movement. UGH! I put out a video on it yesterday, some of you saw it, I’ll put another one out soon). . .

… but when it was time to stretch, especially the partner stretches where someone would partner with us and pry our legs open, I’d scream with pain – literally.

And to me, my latest book “Advanced, PROFOUND, Isometric and Flexibility Training” is named what it is for a reason.

One, what I teach you in this new book goes above and beyond what I did in the last (and very well received!) book.

Two, the stretches once you’re done – truly make you feel profound and light in a way nothing else can!

True, flexible shoulders are important, but to me, it’s far more important to have insanely flexible HAMSTRINGS – and hips – and groin.

The Hindu pushups I teach in 0 Excuses Fitness do a great job of opening those areas up, truth be told though, they pale in comparison to some of the stretches I’ll teach HERE – and specifically, how to GET into some of those positions.

Think about it.

You can squat an elephant, perhaps.

But what good be all that strength if you can’t lift or stretch your legs out to KICK with any power – or precision?

That kicking power comes from the core, from the HIPS and core.

And you’ll notice this book is FAR heavier on opening up the hips, hamstrings and calves – than even the last book – for a damn good reason.

“When you open up the hamstrings, you do more than just open up and “free up” the body’s “airwaves” like nothing you’ve ever done before – you open your LIFE up. “.

Trust me, you’ll feel it as do these movements.

And for those of you that are truly interested in learning about how the old timers DID it, how the old timers built that extreme strength and flexiblity through isometrics, unstoppable tendons as it were, then get this book NOW.

But be warned.

Like with the last book, I only want those that are truly interested, not idiots complaining about this and that all the time.

The opening chapters of the book also have a few additional tips, NOT exercise related, see if you can spot ’em.

They certainly aren’t REQUIRED tho.

Get this book now.

I’ll be back soon!

Best,

Rahul Mookerjee